Visiting Home: Omaha

Instagram understandably gets a pretty bad rap for poor file quality, but to me there is an intriguing side.  It’s simple system of organizing chronologically makes it a perfect time capsule for ongoing visual reportage.  And if that weren’t enough, it’s inherent idealized aesthetic makes collecting “perfect little specimens” of an experience effortless. This is especially interesting to me when I return to Omaha, because I always want to capture “home” perfectly, but in the end I know that is an impossible goal. Over time Instagrams start to become memories that precede the actual events they represent. I enjoy playing in this space creatively and visually. I think Instagrams are best viewed on the tiny screen of a smart phone device, which can be held ever so tenderly in the palm of your hand like a butterfly. Here are a few snaps from my recent visit home.

I Will Fly Away III

I came across another of many seagull photos from my trip to Australia in February and March of this year.  It doesn’t matter where I am, I’m usually making images.  I travel a lot for work and the contents of this blog reflect that.  But whether I’m far from home or restlessly awaiting my next trip, I’m almost always photographing.  I look for excuses to get in the car and drive somewhere new, even if it’s just down the road a short way.  Simple, everyday moments like this are all around us, near or far.  I get a lot of joy just searching for them.DSCF2588sm

Bleistift

I chose this image to mark our trip to Frankfurt.  We got back over a week ago and I’ve been so busy in the office I haven’t had time to post much.  The building featured near the middle of the frame is the MesseTurm, a 55-storey skyscraper in the Westend-Süd district of Frankfurt.  It’s the second tallest building in Frankfurt, the second tallest building in Germany and the third tallest building in the European Union.  Locals often call it Bleistift (pencil) due to its shape.

BleistiftSmall

I Will Fly Away II

“He put on a little knapsack and he walked through Indiana and Kentucky and North Carolina and Georgia clear to Florida. He walked among farmers and mountain people, among swamp people and fishermen. And everywhere people asked him why he was walking through the country.
Because he loved true things he tried to explain. He said he was nervous and besides he wanted to see the country, smell the ground and look at grass and birds and trees, to savor the country, and there was no other way to do it save on foot.”
John Steinbeck, Cannery Row

walkersmall

I can fly, but today, I will walk.